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HOW CAN I GET MORE OXYGEN

Despite popular belief, heavy breathing does not deliver more oxygen to cells for respiration. Because CO2 and pH govern the release of O2 from hemoglobin, ensuring there is adequate CO2 in the system is the best way to dilate blood vessels and allow for the release of O2 from hemoglobin.  When excess breathing is chronic, it not only reduces CO2 levels when over-breathing is occurring, but the circulatory system gets used to lower CO2.  This results in the body getting used to low CO2, and because this would cause a chronic surge in pH (respiratory alkalosis), the kidneys compensate by not creating as many bicarbonates (the important buffer molecule!), making them even more susceptible to environmental shifts.   This is a reduction in “CO2 adaptation”**. That said, if a person’s physiology is healthy and CO2 levels are in balance throughout the day, then exercises such as yoga, HRV breathing exercises, pranayama or fire-breathing (which can cause a drop in CO2 during the exercise) shouldn’t be harmful as long as the breathing exercise doesn’t become a habit. Most of us, however, need training that will automatically have us naturally breathing more lightly, rhythmically and non-noticeably when at rest – details in the FAQ titled “What does good breathing look like?”. Even if symptoms are not evident, chronic CO2 levels below 35 mmHg in the blood present a stress to our systems. How does one provide more oxygen to tissues, muscles and organs in need? By building CO2 adaptation through Respiratory Fitness Training.

During exercise, additional oxygen from heavier breathing allows the tissues and muscles that are working to develop energy/ATP. With healthy physiology and respiratory fitness, even during wind sprints, it is possible to obtain all the air one needs from nose-breathing!

**Like respiratory fitness, CO2 adaptation is a physiologically balanced condition where CO2 levels in the circulatory system remain normal to optimal (35-45mmHg and 40-45mmHG respectively) during all aspects of living. CO2 adaptation is reduced with chronic over-breathing. This makes an individual more vulnerable to internal/external environmental swings and hence more likely to experience a variety of symptoms when the environment is less than perfect.  Research shows that for those not CO2 adapted (those without good RF), an increase in CO2 itself – can create anxiety.   RF training slowly desensitizes an individual to higher levels of CO2, thereby reducing the likelihood of these feelings and physiological imbalance.

Despite popular belief, heavy breathing does not deliver more oxygen to cells for respiration. Because CO2 and pH govern the release of O2 from hemoglobin, ensuring there is adequate CO2 in the system is the best way to dilate blood vessels and allow for the release of O2 from hemoglobin.  When excess breathing is chronic, it not only reduces CO2 levels when over-breathing is occurring, but the circulatory system gets used to lower CO2.  This results in the body getting used to low CO2, and because this would cause a chronic surge in pH (respiratory alkalosis), the kidneys compensate by not creating as many bicarbonates (the important buffer molecule!), making them even more susceptible to environmental shifts.   This is a reduction in “CO2 adaptation”**. That said, if a person’s physiology is healthy and CO2 levels are in balance throughout the day, then exercises such as yoga, HRV breathing exercises, pranayama or fire-breathing (which can cause a drop in CO2 during the exercise) shouldn’t be harmful as long as the breathing exercise doesn’t become a habit. Most of us, however, need training that will automatically have us naturally breathing more lightly, rhythmically and non-noticeably when at rest – details in the FAQ titled “What does good breathing look like?”. Even if symptoms are not evident, chronic CO2 levels below 35 mmHg in the blood present a stress to our systems. How does one provide more oxygen to tissues, muscles and organs in need? By building CO2 adaptation through Respiratory Fitness Training.

During exercise, additional oxygen from heavier breathing allows the tissues and muscles that are working to develop energy/ATP. With healthy physiology and respiratory fitness, even during wind sprints, it is possible to obtain all the air one needs from nose-breathing!

**Like respiratory fitness, CO2 adaptation is a physiologically balanced condition where CO2 levels in the circulatory system remain normal to optimal (35-45mmHg and 40-45mmHG respectively) during all aspects of living. CO2 adaptation is reduced with chronic over-breathing. This makes an individual more vulnerable to internal/external environmental swings and hence more likely to experience a variety of symptoms when the environment is less than perfect.  Research shows that for those not CO2 adapted (those without good RF), an increase in CO2 itself – can create anxiety.   RF training slowly desensitizes an individual to higher levels of CO2, thereby reducing the likelihood of these feelings and physiological imbalance.